your First Source for Fashion, Music, Art, Culture, Design, Content, Communication and Creation http://www.knotoryus.com You couldn't ketchup even if we handed you the tomatoes Fri, 23 Jun 2017 09:59:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 KNOTORYUS TALKS TO BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE ABOUT ‘ART IS COMIC’ AT MIMA http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23692/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23692/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 09:35:26 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23692 Allow me to paint you a picture. The wildly talented visual artist and illustrator Brecht Vandenbroucke has had his work splashed over anything from the New York Times to Prada shirts and don’t get us started on those unforgettable Walter Van Beirendonck collabs. With a relentless eye for detail, this young Belgian picks up on every little perversion of our daily realities and mirrors them in painted comic strips and collages, even sculptures, with an unignorable candour mixed with pop iconography relatable to all. Speech bubble: it should come to no one’s surprise that Brecht Vandenbroucke was hand-picked by Alice van den Abeele and Raphaël Cruyt, taste level impeccable as ever, to be co-curator for MIMA’s new expo “Art Is Comic”, opening June 23. The exhibition is meant to provide solace in a world of terror, a belly laugh to ... Read More »]]>


Allow me to paint you a picture. The wildly talented visual artist and illustrator Brecht Vandenbroucke has had his work splashed over anything from the New York Times to Prada shirts and don’t get us started on those unforgettable Walter Van Beirendonck collabs. With a relentless eye for detail, this young Belgian picks up on every little perversion of our daily realities and mirrors them in painted comic strips and collages, even sculptures, with an unignorable candour mixed with pop iconography relatable to all. Speech bubble: it should come to no one’s surprise that Brecht Vandenbroucke was hand-picked by Alice van den Abeele and Raphaël Cruyt, taste level impeccable as ever, to be co-curator for MIMA’s new expo “Art Is Comic”, opening June 23. The exhibition is meant to provide solace in a world of terror, a belly laugh to counter the stomach ache that watching the news can give you. To achieve this, the team of three gathered the cream of the cartoon crop in the form of visual artists Brecht Evens (BE), HuskMitNavn (DK), Joan Cornellà (SP), Mon Colonet & Spit (BE), Jean Jullien (FR) and Brecht Vandenbroucke himself. Always evolving, these days Vandenbroucke wants to lighten up the visual – but keep the message clear as day – by working around the theme of “Bread and Circuses”. “Art Is Comic” will feature new Brecht Vandenbroucke pieces such as a giant foosball table as well as much-liked (@brechtvandenbroucke is on its way to 50K followers) artworks from his archive. We sat down with the artist to discuss the curating process, art in the age of the troll and lessons from Walter Van Beirendonck.
Brecht Vandenbroucke for “Art Is Comic”


KNOTORYUS: What’s the origin story behind your collaboration with MIMA and the artist picks that were made for “Art Is Comic”?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Alice and Raph had previously bought one of my works for the permanent collection of MIMA, a piece from my book “White Cube”. About a year ago, they asked me if I felt like helping them curate this new expo and I immediately said yes. I knew A.L.I.C.E. Gallery and I had already visited the MIMA, I think it’s a marvelous museum and I’m really glad it exists. Finally there’s a place for contemporary visual culture here, whether it’s street art or illustrations, with a real connection to the online world, to the now! Once we started brainstorming about which artists we had in mind for the show, it was a very organic process like a dialogue. I immediately thought of Jean Jullien, I knew his online work but a few months ago I had also visited an expo of his sculptures in Ghent. I enjoyed seeing his ‘flat’ works translated into 3D. To me, his sense of humour is really refined, he has a very different take on things.

Jean Jullien – “Table Man”

I had also previously painted with Joan Cornellà at a French comic strip festival called “BD Aix“, together with Herr Seele. We did a panel in Washington together as well, so I’d gotten to know him better. He has masses of followers and a gigantic online presence, his work has almost become something of a meme, which is also a new phenomenon for imagery. I think his art is really suitable for that kind of massive sharing, because there’s a certain emptiness there. You can project any kind of emotion into those dark-eyed faces.

Joan Cornellà – “Civic-mindedness”

The next artist, Brecht Evens, I went to college with. We’ve worked on several projects, held expos together and we sometimes draw together. He has a different way of working, he creates books and full-length stories. That is a common thread of all the artists present, making very narrative, figurative art of today. Whether on a vase or a table, all of the artists can draw. Alice and Raph proposed to add HuskMitNavn and Mon Colonel & Spit so since the amount of space is limited too, we decided it would be fantastic if we could get everyone together in this way.”
Brecht Evens – preview from upcoming book

KNOTORYUS: As a curator, what did you focus the most on?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Firstly, I had to contact the artists and convince them to participate. They’re very busy; big artists like Joan Cornellà or Jean Jullien get tons of requests, so I was very glad that they agreed to participate. I followed up with the artists and we frequently held meetings about who to feature in which space, who’s showing what, to create a kind of storyline, a course. We didn’t want someone making a sculpture and another artist putting another sculpture right next to it.”

HuskMitNavn for “Art Is Comic” in progress (image: HuskMitNavn)

KNOTORYUS: What did you find the most challenging in taking on this role?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “All of these artists have their own identity and the most important thing to me was showing that. It’s not easy creating an overarching storyline in the expo because everyone is so different but to me it was more essential for all the artists to have good personalities and their own oeuvre and then do that justice as much as possible. You can’t forcibly draw connections if they’re not there. But I think that organically, a story is being told here.”

Mon Colonel & Spit – “Pedro Winter”

KNOTORYUS: You also created a couple of original pieces for the expo, when did you start working on those?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “The foosball table sculpture we started on around the new year. The paintings I worked on these past few months. I was mainly into the idea of sports and games, ‘Bread and Circuses’. Because on social media, everything is jumbled together. If you scroll down your Facebook feed, you’ll see a very political video and next up is a cat tripping over something. I wanted to represent the mixture of those two things, but translate it to a result that’s not too heavy. My work is always very influenced by pop culture and direct communication. I don’t make abstract paintings, I want there to be a story, joke or idea being told. Evoking emotion. Sometimes it’s very dark, sometimes it’s sad and sometimes just plain funny.”

Brecht Vandenbroucke – “No one said it was going to be fair but it’s not a reason to give up” (2017)

KNOTORYUS: That direct aspect of your work is also what makes it very shareable online, it gets people to react a lot.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Indeed, sometimes those reactions are good, sometimes they’re bad. It’s about subjectivity. Sometimes you publish a post and you think: “Oh dear”. There are few subjects that are not sensitive.”

KNOTORYUS: The expo is meant to provide a positive counter-reaction to the issues of the world, we were once more reminded of the importance of that this week in Brussels.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “A sense of humour is very important here, I think. It’s very difficult for all of us to come together because everyone is part of the media now, and the media tends to focus on extremes, on those who yell the loudest. And everything in between sort of disappears, but those are actually the people who are just… living their lives. That’s very tiring. It’s a kind of complex, confusing mess. So the sculpture I created contains all these different concepts. There’s not really a clear enemy figure represented, there’s a double unfairness going on when you see a lot of small foosball figures who could be turning against one big guy blocking the goal. You could interpret it in two ways, I leave it to the visitors to decide who the bad guy is. It could be about populism, with all those little followers and a big one representing a certain ideal. Or it could be about a social movement trying to create progress which is being blocked by a single person. That’s also something we’re dealing with today. It’s up to you to decide how the game should be played, and if it’s even possible to play.”

The artist and the sculpture – image by KNOTORYUS

KNOTORYUS: Are you frustrated by what’s going on all around us?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “It does something to you. I try to consume less information online. I’m not on Twitter.”

KNOTORYUS: That’s probably for the best.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: (laughs) “Yes. It’s very hard to find any nuance on social media. Which in itself is an issue for me, because I sometimes create extreme things. Which makes me stop and reflect on whether I’m doing the right thing. You can’t escape it, it’s a continuous search because the world was different just 3 years ago, even here in Belgium. You have to keep evaluating what’s good and what’s bad. So I created a painting with a football ref proclaiming that he doesn’t even know the score anymore, and there are a bunch of yellow and red cards falling from the sky. Amidst all the chaos, who am I to judge?”
Brecht Vandenbroucke for “Art Is Comic” – image by KNOTORYUS

KNOTORYUS: The idea for the expo is to bring your family and your kids along. You’ve also mentioned before that your work contains a lot of references from your childhood, so maybe kids will come here and create new references for themselves. When I was a kid, I was obsessed with reading comic books and drawing my own. I use to make one called “Super Britney”, which is exactly what it sounds like. I’d like to know what you would want kids to take away after seeing the expo, even though the themes are sometimes more adult?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I hope the expo creates new references for kids visiting, my work for example is about such a mixture of things. I put up paintings here that look at the world in the way a child does. As a child, you ask a lot of questions because everything’s new. You try to understand the world and, it’s funny, you immediately check if something is good or bad, wrong or right, allowed or not. Kids are constantly asking why something is the way it is. I feel like grown-ups often lose that. They decide something is what it is, and “I won’t change my mind”. Hopefully we can make the adults see things more like kids do. It’s all about not getting set in your way of thinking.”

KNOTORYUS: What were you reading and watching growing up that shaped your world of references? 

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I was raised on “Suske & Wiske” comic books and I’m a big fan of “Quick & Flupke”, I thought that was great when I was a kid. I watched a lot of TV, mainly cartoons with action figures, and soaked up pop culture like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles or Batman. I grew up on a farm with four brothers and we’d all draw. I had my own monthly, with deadlines and articles that I wrote, I made games and collectible bonus points and collector’s cards… Just copying everything I’d see in real life. I also made a Nintendo from paper, with a controller and cables cut out of paper. Just making things.

KNOTORYUS: I can really relate to that, there was this phone I wanted as a kid but I didn’t get it so I made an exact replica out of cardboard. Maybe it’s a kind of way to create a reality that isn’t there for yourself? 

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Indeed! I’m also fascinated by everything artificial, that’s why I like toys and such. There’s a painting at the expo about a selfie, that points out the artificiality of certain aspects of life. The limit between fake and real gets lifted in a drawing. If you paint something photo-realistically and juxtapose it with a cartoon figure, it clashes. It’s like Roger Rabbit, suddenly it’s real. I like toying around with that, that’s also a part of mixing everything.”

KNOTORYUS: It’s clear your hunger for pop culture hasn’t abated since childhood.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “It hasn’t, albeit it’s a bit less geeky now because my world has expanded. I’m more invested in visual arts now, I think it’s fun to juxtapose that with pop culture and see what comes out. There’s no division between them, to me. It’s all part of visual culture. I try to look at what an artist doing as an individual. If the intention is to make something childlike and to entertain, and it’s working, that’s good work to me. If you can combine both low and high culture, that’s good for me too.”
Brecht Vandenbroucke – “POPulism”

KNOTORYUS: This week in Paris, the Walter Van Beirendonck SS18 runway show took place. There’s big Brecht Vandenbroucke hanging up at my home in the form of a FW16 “WOEST” invite. Can you talk about how you ended up working together?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I’ve been a fan of Walter’s for years. I think I first saw his work when I was sixteen, at the expo “MODE 2001 LANDED – GELANDED”. “Mutilate” was one of the exhibitions he curated for that, I just remember seeing his work for the first time and immediately connecting to it. So I just followed him ever since. Then one day he spotted my work in an episode of “De Canvasconnectie”, a Belgian show documenting the work of different artists. There are some correlations between what we do, so he asked me if I felt like painting the “WOEST” show invites, which was of course the case. He also proposed making T-shirts featuring the invite print, but I was determined to create a separate piece for those. It was such fun, because Walter Van Beirendonck always has a big story behind his collections. He knows how to tell a new story each time, and they’re very well-documented. He told me what the collection was about and showed the elements of the story he wanted to tell at that time. That creates such a rich soil to base a drawing on. And eventually I also painted the shoes for the runway show, that was amazing. We even did a window display for Coccodrillo Antwerp for those shoes. What he does is just amazing. It’s always so positive too, I think that’s something I can learn from his work. Sometimes there’s a certain cynicism that’s pervasive in my art and with him it’s very focused on the positive, I really think that’s wonderful. I believe that’s what the world needs, especially now.”

Brecht Vandenbroucke for Walter Van Beirendonck FW16

KNOTORYUS: The world does need a little more Walter, preach. Has this experience impacted the actual work?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Yes, I’ve noticed I’ve started doing different things since then. I still use my art to protest, but I’m actually a very happy person. I don’t seek out conflict. There are a few things in the expo that could be a touchy subject to certain people, there’s an ironic use of humour, but it’s there to get a point across.”

KNOTORYUS: Your work is often quite charged and satirical and it has also featured big corporations in that context. Has that ever gotten you in trouble?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I don’t really make that kind of work anymore; I don’t feel like it at the moment. The paintings I did featuring big name brands are mostly from five years ago. The world has changed and I’ve grown up too. It’s still my work and I stand behind it, but I’ve noticed I’ve moved on to different things. I’m creating my own world and my own fantasy, because the real world is so dark. I think it’s a good thing to go all-out on escapism, it’s not a bad thing. As soon as you make some sort of statement, you get piled on from all sides. I haven’t faced too many problems with this, fortunately, but I don’t feel like adding to the drama in this moment. I feel that what we need now is more middle ground. Healthy common sense.”

KNOTORYUS: By evolving in this way, you’re creating your own references and icons, like my fave: Shady Bitch. I have to ask, is Shady Bitch inspired by anyone real?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Oh, by many people. (laughs) Friends, even! I just wanted to make a new comic strip and actually, I wanted to have “Shady Bitch” pop up behind my name when people googled it. I thought that’d be funny. Now I make new episodes of “Shady Bitch” for a French magazine, every two weeks. I enjoy doing that a bit more, it’s a bit lighter.”

Brecht Vandenbroucke – “What Happened” (2017)

KNOTORYUS: Do you work on new art each day?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I work every day. Not as much now because I’m busy here, but I’m usually creating something. The fun part of it all is that it could be anything, an assignment or my own thing, fashion design. It’s very varied, that’s what I like the most. Making a sculpture for this expo was also great fun. As long as we’re working.”

KNOTORYUS: Are there figures in TV or pop culture that interest you today?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “There’s so much. I like Broad City.”

KNOTORYUS: Oh my God, yes. The new season is coming out this summer.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I saw the trailer! I follow a lot of illustrators too. Simon Hanselmann is a cartoonist from Tasmania. He has created these three figures, Megg, Mogg and Owl and they’re just incredibly funny. I think that’s going to become a new classic. I read a lot. I always fall asleep watching films.” (laughs)

KNOTORYUS: Belgian comic books have a very rich history, but they’re often problematic when it comes to representation. What I think is so great about your work is the vast diversity of the world you show; your characters aren’t always good or bad but they’re always real. Why is it important for you to portray this?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “My group of friends is very diverse, so I try to feature that in my work too. I feel like you just have to today, you can’t leave anyone out. That’s just absurd. It’s a logical step.”

KNOTORYUS: But a step that so many still don’t take.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “It’s strange how a lot of people aren’t conscious of this yet. I think, in the world of illustration, it’s getting better. It’s good to see that evolve, having more diversity in drawings. I draw a lot of people, it’s a conscious choice. I pay attention to body diversity too. Bigger people, thinner people, people who are androgynous or gender non-conforming. That can sometimes offend people, I got some angry comments on painting a guy in a bra. But then I just think: “Yeah… So be it.” (laughs) I’ll make what I want to see.”

Brecht Vandenbroucke – “Your Selection”

KNOTORYUS: Which is why I think your work is futureproof.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I don’t know, I hope so. It can go any which way, it’s hard to predict what the future will look like these days. It’s still hard for me to discuss. I draw figures with darker skin tones, but I don’t have that skin tone, so people ask me how I could even paint that. I get criticism from both sides of the aisle. Which leaves me wondering who I am, what I’m allowed to do. It’s hard for me to talk about, so I prefer to just put it in the work.”

KNOTORYUS: I feel like it would be different if you were to focus on one specific reality or race or gender that’s not yours, but the work is framed in a vast amount of diversity of all types. There’s so much there. 

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “That’s true, but people like picking things apart. They wonder why a certain character is placed there or why certain characters are women. And it’s actually good that those things are being reflected upon.”

KNOTORYUS: Especially online. 

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “Sometimes commenters ask why I’ve drawn a man for a certain character. I’ll think: “You’re right”. But I’m interested in men. (laughs) So sometimes I just feel like drawing a man. But then you start wondering if it’s appropriate. Some paintings could be interpreted as an idealised representation of masculinity, if you were to see the work in an isolated space. But I feel like it becomes more clear if you see my work as a whole.”

KNOTORYUS: You’re only seeing one image at a time if you’re on Instagram.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “That’s just it, people are seeing everything very fleetingly or they end up on your @ by accident and wonder what is going on.”

KNOTORYUS: Do you let online comments get to you?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “I think everyone’s sensitive to that, but I try not to listen too much. No one knows the truth, no one is always right, you can only do your best. I think if everyone did their best, we’d be better off. We’re all trying. (laughs)

Brecht Vandenbroucke – “Internet Depression” (2011)

KNOTORYUS: What are you looking forward to this year, rumour has it a new book is in the works?

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: ‘Yes, I’m working on that but there’s so much to do still. I’d like a vacation now! I have my fixed jobs going on, and I make illustrations for certain outlets. So I’ll do that and finish the book. But I’d also like to create a book with all of my works in it. I started in 2008, so I’ve been working for 9 years now. It’d be nice to make a compilation of all of that work.”

KNOTORYUS: “10 YEARS OF BRECHT”.

BRECHT VANDENBROUCKE: “You know, I’d call it “75 YEARS OF BRECHT”, just to confuse people. “He’s been at this for 75 years? How old is this guy?”.
Brecht Vandenbroucke – “A match made in heaven” (2017)

ART IS COMIC
Vernissage:
June 23 2017
6 PM – 10 PM
(free admission)

Exhibition:
June 23 2017 – December 31 2017

MIMA
Quai du Hainaut 39-41
1080 Brussels
www.mimamuseum.eu

Curators: Alice van den Abeele & Raphaël Cruyt in collaboration with Brecht Vandenbroucke
Scenography: Alice van den Abeele & Raphaël Cruyt in collaboration with Antoine Bouillot for Maison Renard

(First picture: Brecht Vandenbroucke by Jef Boes for DM Magazine)

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WHAT KNOTORYUS SAW AT “SHOW 2017” THE HAGUE http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23665/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23665/#respond Mon, 19 Jun 2017 10:03:38 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23665 The Royal Academy of Fine Art The Hague’s Fashion & Textile Department held its annual graduate show this weekend and you know we were front and centre just like last year, opera goggles clutched, to witness it all. A fresh wave of Dutch and international talent is primed to take off with expert guidance at the top from the best of Belgium, Head of Textile and Fashion Jurgi Persoons and faculty members including Marina Yee, Peter De Potter, Jan-Jan Van Essche and Hilde Frunt and here’s what you need to know.Before the flurry of the show took off, we were treated to a personal tour of the “EXPOSED” exhibition, where the four graduating masters of the class of 2017 prefaced their collections. Each master was introduced by Mr. Persoons – whose personal investment in every single of his graduates is ... Read More »]]>


The Royal Academy of Fine Art The Hague’s Fashion & Textile Department held its annual graduate show this weekend and you know we were front and centre just like last year, opera goggles clutched, to witness it all. A fresh wave of Dutch and international talent is primed to take off with expert guidance at the top from the best of Belgium, Head of Textile and Fashion Jurgi Persoons and faculty members including Marina Yee, Peter De Potter, Jan-Jan Van Essche and Hilde Frunt and here’s what you need to know.Before the flurry of the show took off, we were treated to a personal tour of the “EXPOSED” exhibition, where the four graduating masters of the class of 2017 prefaced their collections. Each master was introduced by Mr. Persoons – whose personal investment in every single of his graduates is indisputable as ever as he nudged each one of them to shine. 

Roos Boshart – Image: Roos Boshart & Nico Laan

Roos Boshart explained how she was inspired by going back to the essence of wardrobe staples such as the suit or blue jeans, by stripping them of all context and presenting them in large vacuum wearable installations. Boshart’s intention is to question the audience: “Remember to think for yourself”. Aided by the poster image by Ronald Stoops of Boshart’s vacuum trench ‘dress’ with sunglasses perched atop, the collection is surely one to be remembered.

Thalonja Slui – Images (including top image): @salvezz

Thalonja Slui showed us “Out of Touch”, pieces inspired by outsider art and how people wrongly perceive those of us living with mental illness as out of touch with reality. A glossy firetruck red circular-cut puffa coat lead the concept, complimented with items like a reverse-collar oversize navy jumper, a ruched yellow tabard and reconstructed beige trench. This collection was a particular highlight, as execution aligned squarely with vision and the styling. If you lay the different pieces flat on the floor, the word “TOUCH” is spelled out via the garments.

Veronika Konvickova – Images: Sanne Tak

The third member of the small graduate class, Veronika Konvickova, was mainly inspired by nature, organic shapes and silence. The world is awash with noise; everyone is in a constant rush and Konvickova aims to urge her audience to literally stop and smell the roses. Taking a moment to appreciate the beauty in silence, in nature, in “Silent Wonderlust”.


Rachael Cheong – Images: Viktor Naumovski & Nico Laan 

Final graduate Rachael Cheong went down a more sinister route and based her collection on the idea of doll collectors and the way those porcelain enigmas are sure to know each of your dirty little secrets. Inspired by the manga comic “Monster” by Naoki Urasawa, Cheong implores us to not become dolls devoid of emotions by only showing one glossy side of ourselves on social media. The table-linen cloth used for the garments harked back to the way Rei Kawakubo toys with gingham and the pointed shoulder lines were a stirring touch.

Trumaine Huijts (2nd Bachelor)

Lina Lau (2nd Bachelor)

The show itself, with the natural focal point being the graduate collections, showed promise in bright flickers in each year. Particular standouts were Trumaine Huijts, whose long-sleeved concoctions we eagerly want to see more of and second-year student Lina Lau who showed deft skill at volume and transparency with a collection titled “All We Ever Wanted Was Everything.”

SHOW 2017 was complimented once more by the publication “4 MAGAZINE”, art directed by master Peter De Potter in collaboration with graphic designer Jelle Jespers, which expresses every student’s ultimate vision for their collections through editorials, posters and Q&A’s and a personal “Letter from Jurgi”. The magazine will become available for purchase in selected international book stores (full list here).

Image: Jurgi Persoons

“EXPOSED”

Graduate & Textile Student exhibition

Open till Wednesday June 21
12PM-6PM
Free entrance

Electriciteitsfabriek
de Constant Rebequeplein 20
The Hague

Graduation Festival
Student exhibitions, performances, guided tours, lunch meetings, artist talks and a football tournament
June 30 – July 7

Royal Academy of Art
Prinsessegracht 4
The Hague

Pro Tip: if you’re planning a trip to The Hague this year, go visit the Gemeentemuseum where the “Fashion In Style” exhibition will open soon. It explores the influence of Mondrian and the important Dutch art movement De Stijl on fashion through the ages. The expo, part of an entire year and multiple exhibitions dedicated to De Stijl will run from July 15 until August 13. Info & tickets here.

Runway images: catwalkpictures.com

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THE 1ST CALVIN KLEIN EYEWEAR COLLECTION BY RAF SIMONS IS HERE http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23625/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23625/#respond Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:31:06 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23625 Our fellow countryman Raf Simons, who took home both Mens- and Womenswear Designer of the Year 2017 CFDA Awards for his collections at Calvin Klein a little while ago, also got graced with a very first “Ultima” last night. The “Ultimas” are the revamped Flemish awards commending outstanding cultural accomplishments. Simons received one that can be viewed as a lifetime achievement award.

As Chief Creative Officer of Calvin Klein -he oversees the whole entire brand-, Simons of course is also in charge of curating classic and designing brand new eyewear. And now we get a first look at an entirely new line named after the street address of the Calvin Klein HQ, “CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC” and it boasts some really innovative design. 

My favourite (although I’m absolutely obsessed with the shades from the “Calvin Klein-collection” seen in the campaign image on top) is the CK8057S model. These rectangle-shaped shades with two-toned lenses are inspired by ... Read More »]]>

Our fellow countryman Raf Simons, who took home both Mens- and Womenswear Designer of the Year 2017 CFDA Awards for his collections at Calvin Klein a little while ago, also got graced with a very first “Ultima” last night. The “Ultimas” are the revamped Flemish awards commending outstanding cultural accomplishments. Simons received one that can be viewed as a lifetime achievement award.

As Chief Creative Officer of Calvin Klein -he oversees the whole entire brand-, Simons of course is also in charge of curating classic and designing brand new eyewear. And now we get a first look at an entirely new line named after the street address of the Calvin Klein HQ, “CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC” and it boasts some really innovative design. 

My favourite (although I’m absolutely obsessed with the shades from the “Calvin Klein-collection” seen in the campaign image on top) is the CK8057S model. These rectangle-shaped shades with two-toned lenses are inspired by art deco and come in 4 different colour ways.

Below you’ll see the CK8578S sunglasses, another super sleek rectangle model, this time with a lowered metal line running all along it’s length. 

And the C8058S below has that same cool metal line running across a slightly rounder frame. It also comes in four different colour ways.

All these frames include titanium nose pads and are branded with the CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC logo.  

More details on when and where to get the new CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC collection will follow soon.

Campaign image : Willy Vanderperre (read our interview here)

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BELGIAN VIDEOS TO BE HERE FOR: DARRELL COLE & COELY http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23615/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23615/#respond Mon, 12 Jun 2017 10:55:39 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23615 2017 has already proven to be a great year for Belgian hip hop with artists like Hamza and Damso -whose rise in particular seems unstoppable with his video for “N.J. Respect R” being on the verge of 10 million (!) views as we speak- busting through the noise.

Two of our fellow compatriots just dropped new visuals, the first one being Darrell Cole giving us the beautiful and vulnerable “BOATS.”, which stands for “Based On A True Story”.

The video is gorgeously directed and animated by Remy m. Ndow and tells the story about young Darrell’s chaotic and brave journey from Sierra Leone to Antwerp.

Watch and subsequently count your blessings.[There is a video that cannot be displayed in this feed. Visit the blog entry to see the video.]

The second drop is from that other Antwerp gem Coely, who let “A Polaroid Story” ‘s Elisabeth Ouni earn her ... Read More »]]>

2017 has already proven to be a great year for Belgian hip hop with artists like Hamza and Damso -whose rise in particular seems unstoppable with his video for “N.J. Respect R” being on the verge of 10 million (!) views as we speak- busting through the noise.

Two of our fellow compatriots just dropped new visuals, the first one being Darrell Cole giving us the beautiful and vulnerable “BOATS.”, which stands for “Based On A True Story”.

The video is gorgeously directed and animated by Remy m. Ndow and tells the story about young Darrell’s chaotic and brave journey from Sierra Leone to Antwerp.

Watch and subsequently count your blessings.[There is a video that cannot be displayed in this feed. Visit the blog entry to see the video.]

The second drop is from that other Antwerp gem Coely, who let “A Polaroid Story” ‘s Elisabeth Ouni earn her first full director’s credit on the video for her ode to her Mama called “Celebrate”, a song we’ve seen Coely perform a couple of weeks ago at our friend’s Dalilla Hermans’ book launch.

Shout out to Jojo Kanda from dance formation UMOJA who is a true star.

[There is a video that cannot be displayed in this feed. Visit the blog entry to see the video.]

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PLAY THIS EXCLUSIVE ANTWERP FASHION DEPARTMENT SHOW2017 SOUNDTRACK http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23591/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23591/#respond Tue, 06 Jun 2017 13:43:03 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23591

This weekend, we got to witness a piece of fashion history as the biggest group of masters ever graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts – Antwerp Fashion Department.

I warned our London visitor beforehand: “SHOW2017 won’t be what you are used to seeing during fashion month. This is a full 4(!) hours of looks.”

To be quite honest, even I, who had interviewed all 18 graduating masters for the Magazine (more on where to get your copy soon), was a bit worried about the sheer volume of work we were about to be presented with. But although I have no clue how Walter Van Beirendonck and his team pull it off and at the end I felt like I had been slapped around by the ghosts of couture past, present and future, the quality was high, time flew by and it was a pleasure watching the creations of both bachelors and masters. So a ... Read More »]]>

This weekend, we got to witness a piece of fashion history as the biggest group of masters ever graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts – Antwerp Fashion Department.

I warned our London visitor beforehand: “SHOW2017 won’t be what you are used to seeing during fashion month. This is a full 4(!) hours of looks.”

To be quite honest, even I, who had interviewed all 18 graduating masters for the Magazine (more on where to get your copy soon), was a bit worried about the sheer volume of work we were about to be presented with. But although I have no clue how Walter Van Beirendonck and his team pull it off and at the end I felt like I had been slapped around by the ghosts of couture past, present and future, the quality was high, time flew by and it was a pleasure watching the creations of both bachelors and masters. So a big and heartfelt congratulations to students, teachers, staff and everyone involved.

You can find out more about the 2017 Masters here, but right now, please enjoy this extremely fun “Antwerp Fashion Academy SHOW2017 Soundtrack” featuring most of the music that was played.

(The above images feature work from respectively: Eduard Both, Robbie Van Mierlo, Marta Twarowska and Rushemy Botter.)

More info on the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp Fashion Department here.

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IKEA COLLABORATES WITH OFF-WHITE & DONDA’S VIRGIL ABLOH http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23578/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23578/#respond Fri, 02 Jun 2017 11:27:12 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23578

Looks like it’s finally happening, folks!

Remember a little over a year ago when Kanye was spotted at the Swedish IKEA HQ and everybody was speculating about upcoming Kanye West x IKEA designs?

I always knew Mr. West would never allow a furniture brand collaboration to happen without the obvious involvement of his best friend OFF-WHITE founder/designer + DONDA creative director and architect Virgil Abloh. So when Hypebeast just posted this little video stating a “potential” collaboration (the HB teaser is obviously a smart part of IKEA’s social media strategy) with an “individual, who many will speculate as Virgil Abloh of OFF-WHITE”, I was thinking: “you might’ve put some sly sound effects on that voice, but I heard Virgil Abloh speaking words directly to my face and this, my people, is Virgil Abloh.”

More about the collaboration with OFF-WHITE  will be revealed during the IKEA Democratic Design Days event occuring on June 7 in ... Read More »]]>

Looks like it’s finally happening, folks!

Remember a little over a year ago when Kanye was spotted at the Swedish IKEA HQ and everybody was speculating about upcoming Kanye West x IKEA designs?

I always knew Mr. West would never allow a furniture brand collaboration to happen without the obvious involvement of his best friend OFF-WHITE founder/designer + DONDA creative director and architect Virgil Abloh. So when Hypebeast just posted this little video stating a “potential” collaboration (the HB teaser is obviously a smart part of IKEA’s social media strategy) with an “individual, who many will speculate as Virgil Abloh of OFF-WHITE”, I was thinking: “you might’ve put some sly sound effects on that voice, but I heard Virgil Abloh speaking words directly to my face and this, my people, is Virgil Abloh.”

More about the collaboration with OFF-WHITE  will be revealed during the IKEA Democratic Design Days event occuring on June 7 in Älmhult, Sweden, which will be live-streamed at 3:30 p.m. CET here.

Listen to a snippet from Virgil below.

Exciting but if there’s a collection, will it match my WALTER VAN BEIRENDONCK for IKEA stuff?

I think it probably will.

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SOULWAX – “DO YOU WANT TO GET INTO TROUBLE?” (WATCH) http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23569/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23569/#respond Thu, 01 Jun 2017 14:43:20 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23569 Fresh off the already classic Soulwax album “FROM DEEWEE” (you’re still replaying this record like it’s paying the rent, right?) comes the amped-up new video for the track “Do You Want To Get Into Trouble?” Shot in Paris, the video was directed by Ill-Studio who – as Soulwax’s visual go-to’s – got free range to create what they envisioned. A quote from director Thomas Subreville: “This video is our visual interpretation of this idea of duality and contrast between your imagination as a teenager and the world you really live in.”

It gives you Magritte nods, Gustave Courbet’s “Woman with a Parrot“, power graffiti and general Eat The Rich shit-kicking. Excellent.

Credits: Directed by: Thomas Subreville (Ill-Studio) Produced by DIVISION Cast: Phénix Brossard

Read more about “FROM DEEWEE” here.

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Fresh off the already classic Soulwax album “FROM DEEWEE” (you’re still replaying this record like it’s paying the rent, right?) comes the amped-up new video for the track “Do You Want To Get Into Trouble?”

Shot in Paris, the video was directed by Ill-Studio who – as Soulwax’s visual go-to’s – got free range to create what they envisioned. A quote from director Thomas Subreville: “This video is our visual interpretation of this idea of duality and contrast between your imagination as a teenager and the world you really live in.”

It gives you Magritte nods, Gustave Courbet’s “Woman with a Parrot“, power graffiti and general Eat The Rich shit-kicking. Excellent.

Credits:
Directed by: Thomas Subreville (Ill-Studio)
Produced by DIVISION
Cast: Phénix Brossard

Read more about “FROM DEEWEE” here.

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JOIN KNOTORYUS AT ROYAL ACADEMY OF ART THE HAGUE’S “SHOW 2017” http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23555/ http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23555/#respond Thu, 01 Jun 2017 07:41:03 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23555 As is custom around this time of year, we’re all eagerly awaiting the Royal Academy of Fine Arts – Antwerp Fashion Department show (which is completely sold out!!!) and expo. Let it sink in: every last ticket for SHOW2017, taking place tomorrow and Saturday, is gone and that’s officially jump-up-dance-and-get-weird kind of news.

We couldn’t be more excited. Yet, we are, since the Antwerp Fashion Department magazine will also be sold at SHOW2017 and KNOTORYUS proudly provided the words and master’s interviews for this second collaboration with the Academy on their highly collectible publication.

If your breath is bated to the brim, get ready for another lungful because the Textile and Fashion Department of the Royal Academy of Art The Hague (KABK) is also gearing up for their graduate fashion show and expo on Saturday June 17.  Lead by radical Belgian designer Jurgi Persoons, whom we had the honour to ... Read More »]]>


As is custom around this time of year, we’re all eagerly awaiting the Royal Academy of Fine Arts – Antwerp Fashion Department show (which is completely sold out!!!) and expo. Let it sink in: every last ticket for SHOW2017, taking place tomorrow and Saturday, is gone and that’s officially jump-up-dance-and-get-weird kind of news.

We couldn’t be more excited. Yet, we are, since the Antwerp Fashion Department magazine will also be sold at SHOW2017 and KNOTORYUS proudly provided the words and master’s interviews for this second collaboration with the Academy on their highly collectible publication.

If your breath is bated to the brim, get ready for another lungful because the Textile and Fashion Department of the Royal Academy of Art The Hague (KABK) is also gearing up for their graduate fashion show and expo on Saturday June 17. 
Lead by radical Belgian designer Jurgi Persoons, whom we had the honour to meet at last year’s show, the 2017 runway will stage the work of the grand master’s graduates Roos Boshart, Rachael Cheong Li Zhen, Veronika Konvicková and Thalonja Slui. As in Antwerp, the first-, second- and third-year students will also get a chance to test their mettle that evening. Flanked by visual greats Peter De Potter and Ronald Stoops, Jurgi Persoons art directed an accompanying poster that foreshadows a surrealist affair. In addition to the KABK show, the exhibition “EXPOSED” will take place from June 18 till June 21, where installations from the collections and textile creations from graduates will be shown. This expo will be supervised by noted scenographer Bob Verhelst, who has created unique worlds for MoMu Antwerp, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Maison Martin Margiela, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Graanmarkt 13, Cartier and many more.

We’re here for all this Belgo-Dutch excellence, and we’ll literally be there for both shows too. Follow us on Instagram for the play-by-play, you know we’ll serve you a little Boomerang runway two-step!

Outfit: Roos Boshart – Art direction: Jurgi Persoons – Creative direction campaign: Peter De Potter – Photography: Ronald Stoops – Model: Luka @ Rebel Management – Photo Assistance: Sander

PRACTICAL
“FASHION SHOW 2017”
Saturday June 17
Shows at 6PM and 9PM
Tickets: 15 EUR

EXPOSED
“June 18 – 21”
12 PM – 6PM
Free entrance

Elektriciteitsfabriek
De Constant Rebecqueplein 20
2518 RA The Hague

Tickets & info here.

Top image credits:
Carpet: Joana Schneider – Art direction: Jurgi Persoons – Creative direction campaign: Peter De Potter – Photography: Ronald Stoops –  Photo Assistance: Sander

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KNOTORYUS TALKS TO AVENUE FOUNDER LINA FREDRIKSSON ABOUT HER VERY OWN ADIDAS SNEAKER, HYPE VS INNOVATION AND THE ‘MEH’ OF THE RESELLER http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23527/ Wed, 24 May 2017 14:52:30 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23527

If you’d do a poll among young fashion killers on IG or Snapchat and ask them what item they’d mostly like to release carrying their own name, surely “a sneaker” would come out as top answer. That dream, but for much more legitimate reasons than “it would be lit AF”, has come true for the Swedish/Belgian Lina Fredriksson. For ten years now, through sheer hard work, dedication and a genuine love for the culture she has been making a global success out of her store Avenue, located in the fashion district of Antwerp. Tonight we’ll be celebrating her first collaboration with adidas: the adidas Consortium x Avenue EQT 93/16 Support. A buttery and luxurious but super clean play on the usually leisurely looking model which comes in two high end colourways: black and tan.

KNOTORYUS: First of all, congratulations! I know you’ve been ... Read More »]]>

If you’d do a poll among young fashion killers on IG or Snapchat and ask them what item they’d mostly like to release carrying their own name, surely “a sneaker” would come out as top answer. That dream, but for much more legitimate reasons than “it would be lit AF”, has come true for the Swedish/Belgian Lina Fredriksson. For ten years now, through sheer hard work, dedication and a genuine love for the culture she has been making a global success out of her store Avenue, located in the fashion district of Antwerp. Tonight we’ll be celebrating her first collaboration with adidas: the adidas Consortium x Avenue EQT 93/16 Support. A buttery and luxurious but super clean play on the usually leisurely looking model which comes in two high end colourways: black and tan.

KNOTORYUS: First of all, congratulations! I know you’ve been dreaming about having your own sneaker for a long time and now it’s finally here.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: Thank you! It feels great. The best thing about it is of course that it actually happened, but also that most of the stores who are allowed to sell adidas Consortium-releases placed an order. Which means the adidas x Avenue EQT 93/16 support will be sold in more than 80 of the best sneaker stores around the world.

KNOTORYUS: Tell me a bit about how it all came to fruition.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: Like you said, I’ve been wanting this for years now and I’ve had several talks with different brands, but in the end adidas put up the best proposal and it just felt right. Of course even though we both agreed on collaborating, I still had to convince them of my project and the way I wanted to develop it. Once they signed off on that, it still took a long time to get here. All in all from first stages to us talking today, two years came and went.

KNOTORYUS: So just like owning your own business, releasing your own sneaker is not for the fainthearted…

LINA FREDRIKSSON: (Laughs) I know you know that’s right.

KNOTORYUS: How did you decide on the EQT 93/16?

LINA FREDRIKSSON: For me it was important to have a BOOST-midsole. The first time I laid eyes on a BOOST-release, even before it was available to the public, I fell in love. As far as the model goes, it’s important to choose one that’s in production. Adidas has this enormous product vault, but if you choose something that is not in rotation at the time, it’s an even more complicated and timely process. When my proposal was approved, it was also the first time that adidas would be developing a leather upper on a BOOST-midsole.KNOTORYUS: You worked with product designer Michael Hernandez on this project.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: I am not a designer and you most definitely need one if you are not just merely changing the colours on an already existing sneaker. Sven and I have been fan of Michael’s work for years. He worked at Nike SB during their industry-shifting years when our business partner Gert was there as well. Michael has been working independently since 2014, when he founded his agency ‘The Bruin Co.’

KNOTORYUS: Where did his knowledge come in handy?

LINA FREDRIKSSON: It was great to have him apply all his 26 years of experience to this task, because it hasn’t been easy. It was just really hard working with this type of leather upper. We had to work relentlessly on getting construction and comfort right, while still having it look good. But I think we’ve succeeded.

KNOTORYUS: According to your press release you were also inspired by the work of our legendary Antwerp Six.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: It’s more in the way of how they approached and sometimes deconstructed fashion than: “Oh, I based this part of the shoe on that design from Dries Van Noten”, or whatever. Michael and I wanted to strip away everything that we deemed not necessary and just make a really sleek design. I’ve also looked at my Swedish heritage. I grew up in the late seventies and eighties and during that time all my aunties were knitting, which meant I wore a lot of knitted sweaters. So we looked at popular Swedish knitwear-patterns and used those as an inspiration too.KNOTORYUS: Tell me about the time you moved from Sweden to Belgium.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: I was 22, had just quit my graphic design course in Sweden and started backpacking when I met Sven (founder/owner of Lockwood: the best skate store in Belgium and far beyond, ed. note) and fell in love. I moved here on a whim and thought: “Well, if it doesn’t work out, I can always go back home.” But seventeen years and three kids later, here we are.

KNOTORYUS: Back then you started working at Sven’s first Lockwood store, when did you decide it was time to open a shop of your own?

LINA FREDRIKSSON: I officially became a partner at Lockwood in 2002. Sven and I had started collecting sneakers around that time and that’s when my love for them really took off. It’s almost hard to grasp for young sneakerheads, but you and I both know that back then there was nothing. Nowadays you have at least 6 or 7 releases per week that most of the time drop in one store per country, but back in 2002, 2003 you had to take a plane if you wanted to get your hands on a pair of special sneakers.KNOTORYUS: I remember being in Berlin when Married To The MOB’s AF1 Dunk was released. I was so happy, because there was no way I would’ve gotten my hands on a pair otherwise. And that was in 2008.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: There were no online stores back then. But when Patta opened its doors back in 2004 in Amsterdam, which is not that far from Antwerp, I slowly started to believe that I could make my own sneakerstore work, too. I just really felt that there was a void in Belgium and in Antwerp particularly that I could fill. I opened Avenue in 2007.

KNOTORYUS: You just mentioned the amount of releases per week. Does it feel overwhelming from time to time to deal with that amount of hype continuously?

LINA FREDRIKSSON: It doesn’t overwhelm me, but it’s for sure a blessing and a curse. Sometimes I feel like the sheer amount of back-to-back drops makes it almost impossible to focus on some of our inline or seasonal product: you know, those releases that aren’t surrounded by noise but very often are really innovative. And what happens is that because of the fact that they aren’t hyped up, people aren’t willing to pay full price for them and they wait till they go on sale. Because those items don’t go out of stock until end of season, brands often think the product isn’t good enough.

KNOTORYUS: And that might lead to more focus on hype instead of innovation.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: I think it’s a possibility that might turn into a self-fulfilling prophecy if we’re not careful. But as I said, it’s a blessing as well, because these special launches are good for business and they do liven things up.

KNOTORYUS: Speaking of livening things up: for stores like Patta and Supreme it seems to get increasingly more difficult to do in-store launches for security and safety reasons. How are you experiencing this?

LINA FREDRIKSSON: We’ve learned throughout the years what works and what doesn’t. Our neighbours aren’t too keen on overnight camp-outs so that’s not happening as much anymore. Although I do insist on having a couple of those per year, because I’m old school, I still think an overnight queue is still the most beautiful way to drop a sneaker.

KNOTORYUS: Last week I went by the Raf Simons stocksale when things had quieted down a bit and I overheard some of the young employees talking about how resellers are ruining the business. See, I’m old school when it comes to that. As a student I worked Saturdays and school holidays in one of the best shoe stores in Belgium and there I was taught that it doesn’t matter who you sell to as long as you shift product. And I agree. That whole “fashion has become too accessible” complaint drives me nuts. Like, b., do you want to sell your designs or not? I try to buy the items I want when they drop, but for instance back when the “Black Palms”-collection came out, I didn’t have Raf-money, so I’m glad that there’s such a thing as a reseller, because when I want that cute tank top now, I know I can get it at my doorstep in less than three days.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: I understand what you’re saying but as a storeowner for me there are two types of resellers. You have your guys who are only in it for the money. There is no love for the product and definitely no love for the stores. They wait in line but can get really aggressive when something is sold out or they harass other clients offering them money when they walk out the shop. You had that happen to you.

KNOTORYUS: I’ve walked around with more cash than that, but I’ve rarely felt as anxious as when I was walking around with that bag carrying those black YB750s.

LINA FREDRIKSSON: But then you also have those people who sell off a valuable pair just so they can save up for another pair they really want. I’ve got no problem with that. There used to be a time when brands really got on our case about resellers and looked at it like it was our fault, but fortunately that’s in the past. Which is good, because I’ve already got enough on my plate. (laughs)

KNOTORYUS: That’s what I thought! Ok, I’m going to let you get back to it, but tell me: what do you want most out of this #adidasxAvenue collaboration?

LINA FREDRIKSSON: As I said, my sneaker is launching in eighty adidas “Consortium accounts”, meaning the best stores that get to choose from the top tier catalogue. I am really grateful that all of those stores actually ordered. I’ve talked to you about this over the years: I find it frustrating that so much brand focus is going to big cities like London, Paris and Amsterdam, while Antwerp and therefore Belgium are being overlooked so often. With this release and hopefully many collaborations to come I’m hoping to change that and put our little country on the map.

KNOTORYUS: Good luck, my friend and massive congratulations!

LINA FREDRIKSSON: Thank you!PRE-RELEASE

May 27th 2017 at Avenue Antwerp and Avenue online.

WORLDWIDE RELEASE

June 3rd 2017

Images: Kelly Fober for Avenue

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MOMO SOLO EXHIBITION “BEST PICTURE” AT ALICE GALLERY http://www.knotoryus.com/archives/23516/ Thu, 18 May 2017 12:15:33 +0000 http://www.knotoryus.com/?p=23516 Unlike the weather, you can always count on our faves over at ALICE Gallery to warm the depths of your heart. This time, they bring us a new solo exhibition by artist MOMO, whom ALICE’s Alice and Raphaël have a great history of collaborating with. “BEST PICTURE” opens today and if you’re reading this, you should have iCal-ed that info already! San Franciscan artist MOMO will be presenting a series of studio works at ALICE in his signature post-digital style. A signed and numbered A3-sized Risograph print will also be released at the exhibition, in a limited edition of 99 and in 5 colours. Pegged as an outsider and traveller, MOMO’s enormous, bright murals and public installations have revived many a decrepit street around the world. The artist works in a way that is unlike the M.O. of others, his glitchy creations are actually painstakingly ... Read More »]]>


Unlike the weather, you can always count on our faves over at ALICE Gallery to warm the depths of your heart. This time, they bring us a new solo exhibition by artist MOMO, whom ALICE’s Alice and Raphaël have a great history of collaborating with. “BEST PICTURE” opens today and if you’re reading this, you should have iCal-ed that info already!
San Franciscan artist MOMO will be presenting a series of studio works at ALICE in his signature post-digital style. A signed and numbered A3-sized Risograph print will also be released at the exhibition, in a limited edition of 99 and in 5 colours.

Pegged as an outsider and traveller, MOMO’s enormous, bright murals and public installations have revived many a decrepit street around the world. The artist works in a way that is unlike the M.O. of others, his glitchy creations are actually painstakingly planned ahead and created with an array of “weird”, self-developed tools and computer scripts. His signature distorted and primary colours draw the attention instantly; you’ll never wonder if that was a MOMO you just walked by. You’ll know.

“BEST PICTURE”
A
 Solo Show by MOMO

Vernissage
Thursday May 18
6 PM – 9PM

Exhibition
May 18 – June 24

Wednesday – Saturday
2 PM – 6 PM
Also by appointment

ALICE Gallery
Rue du Pays de Liège 4
1000 Brussels
BELGIUM

For enquiries about the Risograph prints: info@alicebxl.com
www.alicebxl.com

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